Holiday Print Sale

Abandoned Theatre Pittsburgh, PA
Abandoned Theatre Pittsburgh, PA

It’s December so that means it’s time for our annual Holiday Print Sale!

From now until December 31, 8×12, 12×18 and 16×24 prints are 50% off when you use the coupon code holiday2015 at checkout.

http://www.afterthefinalcurtainprints.com/

If you have any questions feel free to email me at matt@mlambrosphotography.com

After the Final Curtain is a personal project, and all profits from your print purchases help me to continue photographing endangered theaters across the United States.

Colonial Theatre

View of the auditorium from the side of the balcony.
View of the auditorium from the side of the balcony.

The Colonial Theatre in Augusta, Maine opened in 1913 and was designed by architect Harry S. Coombs, who was known for designing many local libraries.  In 1926 the theater was damaged by a fire, and much of the auditorium had to be rebuilt. The owners took advantage of this and expanded the size of the theater. Originally the 1,240 seat theater showed silent films, and had an orchestra pit directly in front of the stage so music could accompany the films, but this was covered over as silent films gave way to “talkies” or motion pictures with sound.  

Since this photograph was taken the lobby has been cleaned up and used for live events.
Since this photograph was taken the lobby has been cleaned up and used for live events.

During World War II, bond drives were held at theaters across the country where you could only gain admission by purchasing a war bond, which were certificates issued by the government to help finance military expenses, and the Colonial Theatre was no exception. At one bond drive held at the Colonial, actress and singer Dorothy Lamour made an appearance to help drive bond sales.

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The theater closed in the late 1960s due to declining ticket sales. Mothballed and only used for storage, the building’s roof began to deteriorate. Without regular maintenance, water began to leak into the building and eventually causing three large holes in the wooden auditorium floor.

While the theater was closed water leaked in from the roof and caused the wooden auditorium floor to rot.
While the theater was closed water leaked in from the roof and caused the wooden auditorium floor to rot.

 

Colonial Theatre, Inc. was founded in 1995 with the purpose of buying and restoring the building. A number of developers expressed an interest in rehabilitating the theater, but no plan worked out and the building continued to deteriorate. In 2009, Colonial Theatre, Inc. began the process of getting the theater listed on the National Register of Historic Places as that status would offer some protection and tax breaks if the theater was restored. Five years later, they succeeded and the theater was listed in the summer of 2014. The theater is open for tours on Saturday mornings during the spring, summer and fall months.

In 1929 a DeForest Phonofilm system was installed which allowed the theater to show “talkies” or motion pictures with sound.
In 1929 a DeForest Phonofilm system was installed which allowed the theater to show “talkies” or motion pictures with sound.

In June 2015, an art installation and screening of “A Home for Women,” a documentary by Caroline Losneck, Betsy Caron and Kate Kaminski, was held in the lobby of the Colonial, which was the first movie shown at the theater in almost 50 years. More information about the theater is available at https://www.facebook.com/ColonialTheater and http://www.augustacolonialtheater.org/

 

The exterior of the Colonial Theatre in Augusta, ME
The exterior of the Colonial Theatre in Augusta, ME
View of the side of the balcony
View of the side of the balcony.

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One of the surviving auditorium light fixtures.
One of the surviving auditorium light fixtures.

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Summer Print Sale

Loew's Palace Theatre Bridgeport, CT
Loew’s Palace Theatre Bridgeport, CT

I’m getting married this October so I’m having a print sale to help us go on our honeymoon! Use the code “HONEYMOONSALE” at http://www.afterthefinalcurtainprints.com/ when checking out to get 25% off your order. I’ve added some images from upcoming blog posts as well as new photographs from old favorites (including some shots of the renovated Kings Theatre) to the prints page.

If you have any questions please e-mail me and I’ll be happy to answer them for you.

Kodak Professional Supra Endura Luster paper is used for all print sizes.

Kings Theatre Brooklyn, NY
Kings Theatre Brooklyn, NY
Ceiling, Paramount Theatre Newark, NJ
Ceiling, Paramount Theatre Newark, NJ
Mezzanine, Studebaker Theatre Chicago, IL
Mezzanine, Studebaker Theatre Chicago, IL
Fox Theatre Inglewood, CA
Fox Theatre Inglewood, CA

 

Prospect Theatre

View of the remains of the Prospect Theatre.
View of the remains of the Prospect Theatre.

B.F Keith’s Prospect Theatre opened on September 7, 1914 in the Prospect Park neighborhood of Brooklyn, NY. The 2,381 seat theater was constructed on the site of a synagogue and three apartment buildings. It was designed by architect William McElfatrick for the Keith Vaudeville Company. The Prospect was dubbed “the woodless and postless theater” while it was being built due to the fact that no wood was used in its construction and there were no posts helping to support the balcony. Woodwork was left out of the building so that the theater would be much safer if a fire broke out. The balcony was supported by a 65 ton steel beam, which eliminated the need for support beams that could have obstructed views during performances. Opening advertisements boasted that the balcony was strong enough to support the world’s ten heaviest locomotives.

Continue reading “Prospect Theatre”

Hiatus

Studebaker Theatre Chicago, IL
Studebaker Theatre Chicago, IL

Hi Everyone – Just wanted to let you all know that I’m taking a short hiatus from posting while I finish my book on the Loew’s Kings Theatre. Don’t worry though – the site isn’t going anywhere. I have a backlog of 16 theaters that I haven’t posted yet and plans to photograph many more.  For updates during the hiatus check out the After the Final Curtain Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/Afterthefinalcurtain

Here’s a quick look at some of the upcoming theaters that will be featured on AFtC later this year:

UC
UC Theatre Berkeley, CA
Varsity2
Varsity Theatre Evanston, IL
Warner Huntington Park
Warner Theatre Huntington Park, CA
Fox Theatre Fullerton, CA
Fox Theatre Fullerton, CA

Loew’s Canal Theatre

View of the auditorium from the balcony.
View of the auditorium from the balcony.
B&W Image from the Loew’s Collection, American Theatre Architecture Archive, Theatre Historical Society of America.
B&W Image from the Loew’s Collection, American Theatre Architecture Archive, Theatre Historical Society of America.

The Loew’s Canal Theatre opened in September of 1927 in New York, New York. The Loew’s Corporation contracted with Thomas W. Lamb, one of the foremost theater architects of the 20th century, to design a theater on Canal Street in Manhattan. The 2,314 seat theater was the second largest motion picture theater in the city when it opened. Even though it was a larger theater, it mostly showed “B” movies and serials. Loew’s sold the theater to the Greater M&S Circuit a little over a year after it opened, and bought it back when they went bankrupt in 1929.

Ceiling of the auditorium.
Ceiling of the auditorium.
Auditorium ceiling blueprint
Auditorium ceiling blueprint

On the morning of September 10, 1932, an explosion rocked the front of the Loew’s Canal, throwing the ticket booth into the street and shattering windows on a number of neighboring buildings. No one was injured in the blast, but Edward Brown, the theater’s night watchman, was thrown down a flight of stairs by it. A similar explosion destroyed the entrance of the Loew’s 46th Street Theatre an hour earlier. Both bombings were thought to be connected to the Motion Picture Operators’ Union Local 306, who were on strike at the time and protesting in front of both theaters, but nothing was ever proven.

A close up of the auditorium's chandelier.
A close up of the auditorium’s chandelier.

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According to an article in the New York Post, Comedian Jerry Stiller grew up going to the theater. Stiller says, “we used to go on Saturday morning at the Loew’s Canal. At nine in the morning, they’d show things like the “Fitzpatrick Traveltalk,” cartoons and serials like “Flash Gordon.” By the time you got to 10:30, they’d get to the double-header, two pictures in a row. What happened was, your mother or father would drop you off at nine, and they didn’t have to pick you up until three. That’s where we got our education.

The lobby has been empty since the store that was occupying it closed in the late 2000s.
The lobby was decorated with ornate terracotta ornamentation.

 

Ceiling of the lobby.
Ceiling of the vestibule.
Blueprints of the vestibule and lobby areas.
Blueprints of the vestibule and lobby areas.

Eddie Cantor, who also grew up in the Lower East Side, had the world premiere of his film, “Forty Little Mothers” at the Loew’s Canal in April of 1940. The theater closed in the late 1950s, and by the early 1960s the lobby was converted to retail space, while the auditorium was used as a warehouse. The last occupant of the lobby space was an appliance store and repair shop that closed in the late 2000s.

Parts of the mezzanine were blocked off and used for storage while the lobby was occupied by a retail store.
Parts of the mezzanine were blocked off and used for storage while the lobby was occupied by a retail store.
There are ornate water fountains on both sides of the mezzanine balcony entrances.
There are ornate water fountains on both sides of the mezzanine balcony entrances.

The terracotta façade of the theater was designated a New York City Landmark by the Landmarks Preservation Committee in 2010. Later that year, the Committee to Revitalize and Enrich the Arts and Tomorrow’s Economy (CREATE) teamed up with the building’s owners to conduct a feasibility study to convert the space into a performing arts center. They received a $150,000 grant from the Lower Manhattan Development Corp., but ultimately the project never came to fruition. The building’s owners planned on converting the space into an 11-story condo complex, but the plan was rejected by the NYC Department of Buildings. Currently, the former auditorium is still used as a warehouse, while the lobby space is empty.

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Lamb designed the interior of the theater in the Spanish Baroque style of architecture.
The fire escapes were closed off when the auditorium was converted into a warehouse.
The fire escapes were closed off when the auditorium was converted into a warehouse.
The theater was only mentioned in the news for minor incidents, such as fires or movie premieres.
The theater was only mentioned in the news for minor incidents, such as fires or movie premieres.

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Lions were included in the design of many Loew's theaters.
Lions were included in the design of many Loew’s theaters.
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A close up of the theater’s proscenium arch.

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Another view of the auditorium ceiling.
Another view of the auditorium ceiling.
A look back at the projection booth.
A look back at the projection booth.
The chandeliers still hang in the theater's inner lobby.
The chandeliers still hang in the theater’s inner lobby.
A close up of one of the chandeliers.
A close up of one of the chandeliers.
Ornate plaster-work on the wall of the inner lobby.
Ornate plaster-work on the wall of the inner lobby.
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The contracting firm M. Shapiro & Son began construction on the theater in the fall of 1926.

If you’d like to help with my exploring/research efforts, please consider purchasing a print, all support is very appreciated.

 

© Matthew Lambros and After the Final Curtain, 2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Matthew Lambros and After the Final Curtain with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Holiday Print Sale 2014

Studebaker Theatre Chicago, IL
Studebaker Theatre Chicago, IL

Happy Holidays! From now until December 31, 8×12, 12×18 and 16×24 prints are 50% off when you use the coupon code holiday2014 at checkout.

http://www.mlambrosphotography.com/prints

Don’t have time to get a print framed during this busy holiday season? No problem! As an added bonus I’m including eight framed prints for 50% off, too. Just use the same coupon code (holiday2014) at checkout.

http://www.mlambrosphotography.com/framedprints

If you have any questions feel free to email me at matt@mlambrosphotography.com