Going Attractions: The Definitive Story of the Movie Palace

I’m going to be in a movie! I was interviewed in the lobby of the Loew’s Jersey Theatre in Jersey City, NJ in 2016 for a documentary on the history of the American Movie Palace. I spoke with the director, April Wright, for at least an hour, and some of my ramblings made it into the finished film (and the trailer below.)

I was able to view a rough cut of the film at the Million Dollar Theatre in Los Angeles during the Theatre Historical Society Conclave in 2017, and really enjoyed it (I’m probably a bit biased.) If you’d like to see the film here’s some upcoming screening dates and locations:

Oct. 4: Mystic Film Festival, The Garde Arts Center in New London, CT
Oct 16 & 18: Heartland Film Festival in Indianapolis, IN
Oct. 20: Somerville Theatre in Somerville, MA
Oct 23 – 27: Lake Placid Film Festival in Lake Placid, NY
Oct. 24: Los Angeles Premiere at Laemmle Fine Arts in Beverly Hills, CA
Oct. 25 – 31: Laemmle Music Hall in Beverly Hills, CA
Oct. 28 – 29: Laemmle Claremont in Claremont, CA
Oct 28 – 29: Laemmle Playhouse in Pasadena, CA
Oct 28-29: Laemmle Royal in Los Angeles, CA
Oct 28-29: Laemmle Town Center in Encino, CA
Nov 8-10: Centre Film Festival in Philipsburg, PA

I’ll be appearing at the Somerville, Lake Placid Film Festival, and the Centre Film Festival to promote the film. Some of my work will be exhibited, and depending on the location there will be a short talk/ Q&A.

Here’s the synopsis for the film:

“Other countries built palaces for royalty, in the United States we built them to watch movies.

The 100 year history of how the American movie experience evolved so quickly from nickelodeons to the studio system and huge movie palaces of the teens and twenties and their eventual decline through present day including current preservation efforts.

What started as individual entertainment in penny arcades moved to a shared experience in nickelodeons.  Next, when movies evolved from a lower class entertainment to mainstream, large movie palaces were built and the studio system grew in the teens and twenties.  All of the grand movie palaces were built in a very compressed period of time between approximately 1915 with many converting from Vaudeville, through the early 30s. The addition of sound spawned the golden age of cinema in the 30’s in these architecturally gorgeous theaters in metropolitan areas which thrived as an escape from the great depression.

After World War II, television became popular and single screen theaters followed on main streets everywhere as a result of suburban sprawl and the baby boom.  This led to a sharp decline in the downtowns of American cities. The classic theatres were too large and expensive to maintain.  By the 70’s they tried to survive with exploitation films and alternative programming.  Often these palaces were split or multiplexed.  But more often, they closed, and were allowed to decay. In a country that is synonymous with the film industry, we have allowed our history to be lost as we’ve demolished many of our country’s palaces.

But many individuals have worked tirelessly to preserve, restore and maintain this piece of history so it can be enjoyed by future generations.  However, many still stand in the balance, waiting for the funds to bring these landmarks back to life. “

https://www.goingattractions.com

2 thoughts on “Going Attractions: The Definitive Story of the Movie Palace

  1. Hi, I am in the UK and would love to obtain a copy of the film, it looks wonderful.
    Can I purchase a copy please.
    Best wishes
    Nick Taylor

    • Hi Nick – I’m just interviewed in the film and doing some press for it. It’s not available on home media yet as it’s just been released in theaters. I’d keep checking the film’s website for a home media release date.

      Matt

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