Ritz Theatre

View of the auditorium of the Ritz Theatre.
View of the auditorium of the Ritz Theatre.

The Ritz Theatre in Carteret, New Jersey originally opened on September 1, 1927. According to an article in “The Carteret Press,” which ran the the week before the opening, “it [was] the first modern theater to be erected in the borough and is up-to-date in every respect.” The 1,000 to 1,200 seat Ritz (accounts on the number of seats differ) was designed by local architect John Gliva. It was a vaudeville and silent film house until September 1928, when a Western Electric sound apparatus was installed to allow for the showing of “talkie” films.

The lobby of the Ritz Theatre.
The lobby of the Ritz Theatre.

The theater closed on January 31, 1965, and the building was converted into a sewing factory. However, during the conversion the building was not gutted — instead, walls were built inside the auditorium, which covered and protected the ornate plasterwork. After the bakery that had been occupying the building since the 1980’s closed in 2013, the borough of Carteret took possession and discovered the protected auditorium behind the interior walls.  

The ceiling of the auditorium.
The ceiling of the auditorium.

Carteret planned to restore and expand the Ritz into a 1,600 seat performing arts center and movie theater. In 2015, the borough received a $6 million grant from the Middlesex County Cultural and Arts Trust Fund to be used for the new performing arts center. However, a structural survey conducted during the planning stages revealed that the cost of restoring the existing structure could be cost prohibitive. Moving forward, the borough will either demolish a portion of the theater and incorporate what remains into the new performing arts center or they will demolish the whole building and honor the Ritz in the design of the new one. The opening of the Carteret Performing Arts Center is planned for 2018, and will host live music and cultural events, off-broadway plays and comedy acts.

The walls of the theater were hidden for almost 50 years.
The walls of the theater were hidden for almost 50 years.
According to the Encyclopedia of the American Theatre organ, the Ritz had an organ built by the United States Pipe Organ Company opus 153, size 2/4 with a 3HP blower from Kinetic Engineering Company.
According to the Encyclopedia of the American Theatre organ, the Ritz had an organ built by the United States Pipe Organ Company opus 153, size 2/4 with a 3HP blower from Kinetic Engineering Company.

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View of from the rear of the auditorium.
View of from the rear of the auditorium.

My first book, After the Final Curtain: The Fall of the American Movie Theater is out! It’s available on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, or at your local bookstore. Signed copies are available on my site.

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Adams Theatre

The Adams is one of the 24 theaters in my new book “After the Final Curtain: The Fall of the American Movie Theater.” Find out more here.

View of the Auditorium from the center of the balcony.
View of the Auditorium from the center of the balcony.

The Adams Theatre in Newark, New Jersey originally opened on January 12, 1912 as the Shubert Theatre. It was designed in the Beaux-Arts style by architect William E. Lehman, who also designed the Proctor’s Palace Theatre in Yonkers, NY. The 2,037 seat theater was originally used for theatrical productions, Broadway tryouts and revivals.

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Franklin Park Theatre Dorchester, MA
Franklin Park Theatre Dorchester, MA

Help me pick the next blog post on After the Final Curtain! Cast a vote for the theater you’d like to see next on the site, and whichever has the most votes by Thursday 6/19 will be featured in a blog post on Friday 6/20!

View from the balcony of the Adams Theatre.
View from the balcony of the Adams Theatre.
View from the balcony of the Russell Theatre.
View from the balcony of the Russell Theatre.
Everett Square Theatre Boston, MA
Everett Square Theatre Boston, MA
View from the balcony of the Logan Theatre in Philadelphia, PA
View from the balcony of the Logan Theatre in Philadelphia, PA

Thanks for voting! The Russell Theatre is the winner! 

Fabian Theatre

View of the balcony auditorium after multiplexing.
View of the balcony auditorium after multiplexing.

The Fabian Theatre opened on December 14, 1925 in Paterson, New Jersey. Designed by Paterson architect Fred Wesley Wentworth for theater magnate Jacob Fabian, the 3,228 seat theater was built in a Sullivanesque style with a two ton chandelier, tile floors, murals, and Turkish baths in the basement.

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Paramount (Broadway) Theatre

The paramount theater balcony
View of the Paramount Theatre from the balcony.

The Paramount Theatre opened as the Broadway Theatre in Long Branch, New Jersey on August 1, 1912. The project was commissioned by theater magnate Walter Reade on the site of an old Episcopal church. The 1,772 seat Broadway began showing plays and vaudeville performances before transitioning over to film.

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The Newark Paramount Theatre

The Paramount is one of the 24 theaters in my new book “After the Final Curtain: The Fall of the American Movie Theater.” Find out more here.

View of the Paramount Theatre from the balcony.

The Paramount Theatre opened on October 11, 1886 as H.C. Miner’s Newark Theatre. It was originally a vaudeville house managed by Hyde & Behman Amusement Co., a Brooklyn based theater Management Company. After H.C. Miner’s death in 1900, his surviving relatives retained ownership of the theater for several years until its sale in 1916 to Edward Spiegel, the owner of the nearby Strand Theatre. Spiegel also purchased the building next to the theater with the intent to use the space to expand the theater. To accomplish this he hired famed theater architect Thomas W. Lamb to do the alterations.

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Montauk Theatre

The Montauk Theatre during demolition

The Montauk Theatre opened on January 30, 1924 in Passaic, NJ on the site of a former vaudeville theater — also called the Montauk Theatre — that was popular in the early 1900’s. Designed by local architect Abram Presikel in the Adamesque style, the theater sat 2,638 people and was operated by the Fabian Enterprises theater chain (which was known for showing both First National Pictures and Warner Bros. films).   Continue reading “Montauk Theatre”